News overview

Enough capacity for CO2 storage in US deep saline aquifers

27 March 2012

A new study by researchers at MIT shows that there is enough capacity in deep saline aquifers in the United States to store at least a century's worth of carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's coal-fired powerplants. Though questions remain about the economics of systems to capture and store such gases, this study addresses a major issue that has overshadowed such proposals.

 

Source: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/greenhouse-gas-in-aquifers-0320.html

Shortcut to map of possible CO2-storage in aquifers

From microns to miles

The MIT team modeled how the carbon dioxide would percolate through the rock, accounting not only for the ultimate capacity of the formations but the rate of injection that could be sustained over time. "The key is capturing the essential physics of the problem," Szulczewski says, "but simplifying it enough so it could be applied to the entire country." That meant looking at the details of trapping mechanisms in the porous rock at a scale of microns, then applying that understanding to formations that span hundreds of miles.

When liquefied carbon dioxide is dissolved in salty water, the resulting fluid is denser than either of the constituents, so it naturally sinks. It's a slow process, but "once the carbon dioxide is dissolved, you've won the game," Juanes says, because the dense, heavy mixture would almost certainly never escape back to the atmosphere.

News overview

Search in Website

Search publications»

My CATO

The form has been sent
Please fill in your username
Please fill in your password
Forgot your password?»

Subscribe to our
free newsletter

Click here »

Contact

27 March 2012

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please let us know.

More information»

CATO in the news

27 March 2012

Your daily selection of CCS-news?

 

Log in to MyCATO for 'CATO in the news'